It’s What I always Do

I sit outside the coffee shop
drinking a coffee,
smoking a cigarette.

Except I don’t smoke any more
so the cigarette
is an illusion.

Advertisements

32 Responses to “It’s What I always Do”

  1. Drinking coffee and jotting in my notebook (or on the inside of my forehead) while drinking coffee where others are smoking–no better place for my sketches of proposed WIPs!

  2. Your back πŸ™‚ tea and a fag, they go together.

    David take a look at my new site, maybe your would like to join my band of authors, you can see them all on the authors page at the top.

    http://poetscornerblog.wordpress.com/

  3. The charms of English syntax and the flexibility of the stress contours of the English sentence are on display here– Bravo!

  4. Hi David

    this poem to me sounds like a nice calm conclusion and acceptance of the sensible road to take πŸ™‚

    I am very happy that you made the decision to quit smoking πŸ™‚ and I hope that won’t be an illusion! Did you succeed because of the electric thing?

    Anyway, keep it up and good luck!

    Arohanui πŸ™‚
    xxx
    Ina

    • Hi Ina,

      Yes the electronic cigarette is what has made this possible.
      One month now and mostly OK with it.
      Although I could perchance be a little irritable at times!!! πŸ™‚

      Thank you

      Arohanui
      David
      xxx

      • One month already, good for you! (I remember you smoking on the 18th of June lol so it was soon after the launches) And I am sure that, once you are used to the new freedom πŸ™‚ you will be your charming old self again! *Big grin*

      • I stopped Ina in between that launch and the final one on the Sunday.

        Too many poems in the book which included cigarettes methinks!!! πŸ™‚

        David
        xxx

      • πŸ™‚ So the book has a bonus function, the mirror…
        Think of all the fresh air in your car πŸ˜‰ and home of course, and you will feel so much better!

        xxx

      • *Smile*

        Our poetry does that Ina does it not – hold up a mirror to ourselves!!! πŸ™‚

        And yes, I do feel so much better

        David
        xxx

  5. David,

    This poem is cleverly written – you have said tons here!! πŸ™‚

    I am so very proud of you, this is some achievement πŸ™‚

    So lots of fresh, sunny smiles for you :):):):) and even more (((HUGS)))

    Love you loads

    Christine

    xxx (x)

  6. When did you quit smoking? Good for you!!!!!!…

  7. I enjoyed this poem. I too have had moments of catching myself doing what I’ve always done…except for…something…that I realize is missing but still present in its absence. Nice.

  8. Witty as always, David, but I should say wistful too!

  9. As a friend of imaginary dragons I suspect that I will always have friends who smoke volumes, but I remember when my father quit after a lifetime of smoking. His character was really in the words he was always using when asked the question, how you doing?
    He’d say, well, I’m finer than frogs hair sitting on a split wood fence blowing in the wind. Then he had this way of looking people in the eye before he said, And how are you?
    His irritability was noticeable for awhile, but short lived. In the end he was who he was, and his smile quickly dominated days again.
    If I retire I can imagine myself sitting in a coffee shop with David Agnew, not smoking while the illusion of smoke pours from a dragon’s illusionary nostrils. That would be a good day indeed. At least that’s my illusion after reading a clever, clever poem.

  10. Cleverly understated – that “illusion”. The atmosphere is still there, even without the smoke – congratulations on quitting! πŸ™‚

  11. Francina Says:

    Very well expressed, David. To quit smoking is very hard to do. I don’t smoke since a couple of years and I no longer miss it. It’s more the habit of smoking that you have to beat, Keep up the good work! You can do it. πŸ™‚

    Ciao, Francina

  12. habit and ritual …. i have a smoke when the mood strikes. found out years ago that the coffee was much more greatly missed.

  13. You aren’t smoking anymore? Is that true, or just poetics? I’m interpreting the poem as being about the disorientating sense of loss one experiences when one gives up the cigs, it can seem a bit like losing a friend or a partner at first! Although cigs are a pretty crappy friend in my estimation! πŸ™‚ I only just saw this. I miss some postings on FB because of the time diff.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: